5 Quick Fixes to Make Your About Page Shine

Many companies spend a lot of time fussing with their home pages or sales pages and neglect the poor “About Us” page, which ends up as the place to dump standard boilerplate information about the company, replete with a stock photo of two business people shaking hands.

Instead of doing the same-old, same-old, give your About page the attention it deserves. 

People find your website in a variety of ways.

Some will search for a specific topic and click on search engine results to read a blog post, then click through to the remainder of your site. Others will type the URL into their browser and head directly to your home page.

And there are those who may search for information about your company as they do their homework after hearing about you. That’s when they may land on the About Us page first.

Your About US page can be a valuable sales tool instead of a simple placeholder if you implement these five fast and inexpensive changes.

Here are five quick fixes you or your web designer can implement rather quickly.

Some, such as writing new copy for the site, may be a task best handled by your marketing manager or a professional freelance writer. Others, like a good team photo, may be on your computer already.

Review this list and implement the ideas as soon as you can, and your About page will shine. 

1. Add an actual photo

Ditch the stock photo. Have someone in the office take professional headshots of each employee as well as a group picture.

Better yet, hire a professional photographer for an hour or two to come into your office and take good photos. You can use them on the About page, your website, social media accounts and more.

Professional photos that enhance your brand help draw visitors to your site. They also help visitors get to know and trust you, which is the key to getting them to contact you for potential business.

2. Write a value-based headline

Everyone just dumps “About” on their page and calls it a day. But the value doesn’t stop on the home page. A value-rich headline that describes what you do FOR your customers (the benefit) rather than just what you do (the feature) adds to the overall picture you’re painting about your business and why customers should trust you.

A marketing firm might write “We connect small businesses with local customers.” An IT company might lead with “Our mission is to take the hassle out of your technology systems.”

3. Tell your story

Most businesses write the same old thing:

“Winning Widgets, founded in 1829, manufactures and sells award-winning widgets for all your widget needs.”

Boring! Tell your story in your voice, your way. Share your tale.

How did your company begin? What motivates you to get up and do what you do each day?

If you are a consultant or other small business provider who works directly with each and every customer, let your own voice ring out.

Again, this is an area where a professional copywriter can help you tell your story, because sometimes writing your own web page is like cutting your own hair: hard to get it right and best left to the professionals.

4. Use third-party endorsements

Third-party endorsements help solidify your image as a trustworthy business partner.

  • Add awards, testimonials, and press clips to your about page. 
  • Mention conferences where you’ll be speaking or exhibiting.
  • Let customers know which membership or trade organizations you belong to.
  • Highlight your Better Business rating. 

Each of these third-party endorsements adds up to a picture that paints your business in a positive light.

5. Mention local towns

Many small business owners want to make their companies look bigger, so they mention only the big metro areas nearby to attract larger clients.  

This is a mistake for two reasons:

  1.  Listing specific locations in your website text and meta data (the words behind a web page readable only by search engines) is important for SEO.
  2.  Many people prefer to do business with a local firm. Adding maps, directions, and town names also helps people find you. 
Find out more about:  The 6 best tools to spice up Google Apps for Work

If you rely on walk-in customers, add your business hours, directions, and a map to help people find you.

The Takeaway  

  • Every web page should work to your business’s advantage

  • Don’t neglect keywords on your About page. While you don’t want to hammer readers over the head with them, infuse some of your website’s keyword phrases into the titles and text on your About page.  

  • Don’t neglect links from your About page either, because they can lead visitors deeper into your website. Make your hyperlinks from phrases in the text and link to other pages on your website such as descriptions of services, testimonials or other pages customers might be interested in reading.

There are, of course, bigger fixes you can make. If you really don’t like your current page, you might opt for a complete redesign – in which case, you should definitely keep the above elements in mind. If you’re seriously retooling your About page, you should consider a larger redesign of your website.

If you’re seriously retooling your About page, you should consider a larger redesign of your website with a modern website builder, it’s just as easy to redo your site with an attractive new look as it is to redesign one key page.

If it’s as welcoming as the front door of your office, you’ll attract and retain more website visitors, turning them into lucrative clients and long-term business relationships.  

Get to work. Make your About page shine! 

What information do you include on your About Page? 

Written by Jeane Grunert
Jeanne Grunert is an award-winning writer and marketing expert with over 20 years of experience. In 2007, Jeanne quit her marketing executive position at a large New York City area publisher, moved to Virginia, opened her own freelance writing and content marketing firm, and began growing a life instead of just making a living. She writes about business, marketing, home and garden topics for Fit Small Business and a variety of publications and websites.